USA Corrugated and Solid Fiber Box Manufacturing

The United States is the world’s largest producer of corrugated and solid fiber boxes, and as of the late 1990s, it accounted for more than a third of total world volume. The total value of corrugated paperboard and solid fiber box shipments in 2000 reached $33.1 billion.

The United States is a major consumer as well as a major producer of corrugated products. In the late 1990s, annual per capita U.S. consumption of corrugated products was the highest in the world—topping 80 kilograms (kg). Japan was the second leading consumer, at just under 70 kg. European nations make up the remaining per capita consumption leaders, with Germany at just under 50 kg, Italy at 45 kg, Spain at 40 kg and the United Kingdom at 30 kg.

One of the key trends in corrugated boxes is recycling; this affects both the material used to make the boxes and how they are disposed of after use. In the late 1990s, about 66 percent of corrugated products were recovered for recycling into new boxes or other paperboard products, which represents the second highest recovery level of any major consumable material (aluminum cans are first). Increased collection of corrugated boxes—including those coming from the homes of consumers—is expected to increase to 70 percent in the early 2000s.

In the late 1990s, the domestic corrugated box industry consisted of 1,740 establishments operated by a total of 996 companies. Of the 1,740 establishments, about 60 percent were independent operations (not associated with a paperboard mill that produces linerboard and corrugating medium) and 40 percent were fully integrated plants (where there is a paperboard mill, a corrugated plant, and a sheeting plant). These establishments include both corrugated plants, which take corrugating medium and linerboard and make it into containerboard, and sheeting plants, which take finished containerboard and make it into boxes. The total number of U.S. establishments continued to decrease in the late 1990s as downsizing and merger activity helped consolidate the industry and eliminate some smaller operations.

The United States is the world’s largest producer of corrugated and solid fiber boxes, and as of the late 1990s, it accounted for more than a third of total world volume. The total value of corrugated paperboard and solid fiber box shipments in 2000 reached $33.1 billion. 
The United States is a major consumer as well as a major producer of corrugated products. In the late 1990s, annual per capita U.S. consumption of corrugated products was the highest in the world—topping 80 kilograms (kg). Japan was the second leading consumer, at just under 70 kg. European nations make up the remaining per capita consumption leaders, with Germany at just under 50 kg, Italy at 45 kg, Spain at 40 kg and the United Kingdom at 30 kg.
One of the key trends in corrugated boxes is recycling; this affects both the material used to make the boxes and how they are disposed of after use. In the late 1990s, about 66 percent of corrugated products were recovered for recycling into new boxes or other paperboard products, which represents the second highest recovery level of any major consumable material (aluminum cans are first). Increased collection of corrugated boxes—including those coming from the homes of consumers—is expected to increase to 70 percent in the early 2000s.
In the late 1990s, the domestic corrugated box industry consisted of 1,740 establishments operated by a total of 996 companies. Of the 1,740 establishments, about 60 percent were independent operations (not associated with a paperboard mill that produces linerboard and corrugating medium) and 40 percent were fully integrated plants (where there is a paperboard mill, a corrugated plant, and a sheeting plant). These establishments include both corrugated plants, which take corrugating medium and linerboard and make it into containerboard, and sheeting plants, which take finished containerboard and make it into boxes. The total number of U.S. establishments continued to decrease in the late 1990s as downsizing and merger activity helped consolidate the industry and eliminate some smaller operations.

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